Printmaking

Lunar calendar print, part 2: haste makes waste!

After 2 layers of paste, and 3 layers of color, this morning I floated one of my lunar calendar prints in water to dissolve the rice paste. After swishing it a bit, I could see that the top 2 layers of color were washing away, leaving only the first blue that I applied.

soaking paste off

soaking paste off

My hunch is that I washed it out too quickly, and since the first blue was applied about 3 days ago, the soy on that layer had sufficient (just barely?) time to cure. Time is a variable for katazome on fabric -- you must allow the soymilk to cure/oxidize for several days at the very least, locking the colors into the fibers. I think this must be true for paper as well.

Here's the difference between the washed print and one still curing in peace and quiet.

WashoutB.jpg

Tonight I will add a final "glaze" of soymilk on the remaining prints, adding a bit more Payne's gray while I'm at it (this color looks most like indigo to me) and then allow the prints to cure for 3 or 4 days before washing them out. I saved my gelatin plate anticipating I might need it again!

Tea Cozies off to Moscow

I sold two tea cozies this past weekend to a woman from Moscow! It makes me smile to think that one will warm her mother-in-law's teapot in Moscow, another her mother's teapot somewhere in France! She bought them from my "old" Etsy shop, which features screen-printed items for the home. The design began as a paper cutting. I call it my Haiku House finch Tea Cozy. The haiku reads: Curious house finch Tastes the ripe crabapple -- Daylight grows short.

Tea Cozies, immersion dyed and screen-printed on 100% cotton velveteen with fiber-reactive dyes © Kit Eastman

Tea Cozies, immersion dyed and screen-printed on 100% cotton velveteen with fiber-reactive dyes © Kit Eastman

I'm working on a new online shop that will feature my katazome work. If all goes smoothly, I plan to launch it sometime in November.